I apologize for taking so long to post in re to the crises our Country is experiencing due to the CoVid-19. I had been out of the country from March 7 until the 14thwhen the US started reporting more cases. It has taken this past week for me to adjust to the severity of this virus and all it involves.

We grieve all losses and now the entire Country is grieving all the changes brought on by the effects of the COVID-19. With this uncertainty of the future comes the risk of crippling anxiety and depression.

In addition to these losses is the grief that occurs following the death of a loved one, creating a complicated grief for the survivors. To make matters even worse, since no more than 10 can gather, visitations and funerals can’t be held at a time when support and connection are so needed.

When a person is grieving there is a tendency to withdraw from society, preferring to stay home. The support from family and friends still provides that connection that is so needed during a time of grief. My concern is that there will be hesitation to reach out for support because everyone is concerned about the future. Without that support, there is an increased risk for clinical depression and anxiety.

During this time of uncertainty, we all have opportunities to reach out to those who are grieving. It’s this connection that will help us get through this difficult time.

How do we cope with all of this grief? It can be so overwhelming and crippling at times. Here are a few ideas as I’m sure most have heard them before.

Limit time on TV and Social Media. I notice my anxiety increases watching the 5p to 7p broadcast and the 10p. Simple solution. I switch the station, turn off the TV or watch a no brainer comedy.

Journal – I recommend a gratitude journal because it’s too easy to write about the negative events and reactions going on in our Country right now. I understand that it may be challenging to find much to be grateful for, but you just have to look for it. This also helps change the negative thoughts and emotions that want to take over.

Here are some ideas to help tune in to gratitude:

Go for a walk outside without your IPod to distract you.

Engage your senses. What do you see, hear, touch, or smell? Don’t forget taste too. Be mindful of your surroundings but don’t stop and jot down these observations just enjoy nature. When you return home, write down all you can remember from your walk and make an entry in your gratitude journal. It helps!!!

Listen to your favorite music for enjoyment, relaxation, or to get energized to get your Spring cleaning done.

Think of a friend who lives alone, feeling more isolate, and give them a call or send a card. Just random acts of kindness will help them and you. ‘

Since I won’t be seeing clients for a while, you can always send me a PM and I’ll return your call. I’m looking for alternate options to see clients but have to work out the details. I’m not very good with advanced technology and am going to consult with my computer friend for guidance.

In the meantime, if you’re struggling with increased anxiety and depression from either the grief of the death of a loved one, or the current situation, or both, I’ve included a few crises hotline numbers;

Grundy County: 815-942-6611

Will County: 815-722-3344

National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1800-273-8255 There website is https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/.

I checked the website out and it’s very informative and easy to navigate.

Don’t go through this concerning time alone!! There is hope!! People Care!!! I care!! Sincerely, Kathy

 

We are still seeing clients during this time in my office following CDC guidelines, or via telehealth if preferred. Please reach out if you'd like to schedule an appointment at (815) 416-9036.

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